Clinical Radiology

Clinical radiology is the use of medical imaging techniques to look inside the body to diagnose, treat and monitor diseases and injuries.

X-ray scanning was the first type of diagnostic imaging, developed following the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today, radiologists use a wide range of imaging methods, including ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and molecular imaging techniques.

A career as a clinical radiologist will allow you to read and interpret medical images in order to diagnose, treat and monitor diseases and injuries. You will be able to do this by using a range of imaging techniques, including X-ray ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and molecular imaging.

You will also be able to run patient clinics, take biopsy samples and prepare patients for surgery, as well as using real-time imaging to perform minimally invasive surgery, called interventional radiology. 

You will have the opportunity to specialise, becoming experts in areas such as musculoskeletal, breast, cardiac, paediatric and gastrointestinal imaging.

You can also work as ‘generalists’, meaning that you work on all types of hospital imaging, as well as doing some interventional work.

Training in Clinical Radiology

  • Clinical Radiology ST1

    Find out all the information you need to apply for training in the specialty of Clinical Radiology

  • Clinical Radiology ST3

    Find out all the information you need to apply for postgraduate training in the specialty of Clinical Radiology